Category Archives: misc

Are bankers really more dishonest?

Nobody likes a merchant banker, and a new report in Nature, Business culture and dishonesty in the banking industry, makes the case that such distaste may have a sound basis: Bankers who took a survey which asked questions about their jobs behaved more dishonestly than bankers who took a survey which addressed mundane, everyday topics, such as how much television they watched per week. It’s a catchy claim. But in contrast to the headlines, the data suggest something else: bankers were more honest overall than other groups, and at worst no more dishonest.

Each group of bankers was asked to toss a coin 10 times and report, online and anonymously, how often it landed on each side. They were told that each time the coin landed on a particular side (heads for some, tails for others), they could win $20 dollars.

The group who took the job-related survey reported 58.2% successful coin flips, while the control group reported 51.6% successful coin flips. Thus, the authors argued, priming the bankers with their professional identity made them more likely to dishonestly claim that they had tossed coins more successfully than they actually had.

To follow this up, the authors conducted two more studies with different populations, non-banking professionals and students. For these two groups, there was no effect of priming with professional identity; control groups and “treatment” (i.e. primed) groups performed similarly. Hence, the headline finding that making bankers think about their professional identity as bankers made them more dishonest. Other groups did not become more dishonest when primed with their professional identity, and thus there is something about banking and banking culture that makes an honest person crooked.

But more dishonest than who?

Curiously, what is glossed over in the main paper – instead it can be found in the extended figures and the supplementary information – is that what was different about the results from the non-banking professionals and students is that the control groups were as dishonest as the primed groups. In fact, of all the groups, the odd one out is the banking control group. Whereas the banking control group reported 51.6% successful coin flips, the non-banker and student control groups reported 59.8% and 57.9% respectively. The primed banking group reported 58.2% successful flips, while the non-banker and student primed groups reported 55.8% and 56.4% respectively.

If we collapse across the control and primed groups and simply look at the average success rate for each sample population, on average, bankers reported 54.6% successful coin flips, non-banking professionals 57.8%, and students 57.15%. Thus, overall, the bankers were the most honest group.

So maybe the headline should be that bankers are more honest than other groups, until they’re reminded that they’re bankers. Then they’re as dishonest as everyone else (or at least, non-banking professionals, and students).

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Frontiers Research Topics

A few months ago, I got an invitation to host a Research Topic at Frontiers, one of the (relatively) new wave of Open Access journals, where authors pay publication costs and readers can freely access articles. Apparently, my recent article would be an excellent fit for the Research Topics initiative! Research Topics are where a couple of editors get together and invite submissions on their pet topic – a bit like a special issue, or a conference symposium. I’ve seen some great examples of these on topics dear to my own heart, like VanRullen & Krieman’s The timing of visual object recognition, so you’d think being asked to host one would be pretty cool, no?

Now here’s the thing: I get plenty of spam. Invitations to random conferences, offers of monoclonal antibodies, invitations to enlarge various appendages. Every couple of months I get a letter from a vanity publishing press asking if I want to publish my thesis as a book. The common theme is that they’re rather impersonal. When I get what reads like a form email that makes only a cursory reference to me and my work and then tells me what a great opportunity it’s providing me, I get suspicious.

After a moment’s pause, I discounted the invitation as spam, as I have done the repeat invitations. And the pause was only because it was from Frontiers, a journal family I like. From a few conversations on Twitter, it feels like this is a pretty common reaction.

The attitude that Open Access is simply vanity publishing is one I clearly disagree with (published in both PLOS ONE and Frontiers), but it’s a long way from being a dead opinion yet. It’s not great if even supporters of the OA movement and Frontiers find these kind of invitations a bit spammy.

There are a couple of things at play here. I’m a junior researcher. Nobody asks me to host a symposium or edit a special issue. I once mentioned to a colleague that perhaps we could try setting up a research topic with Frontiers, and the reaction was “isn’t that really for more senior researchers?” If I start inviting people, I feel like the most likely reaction will be “Who are you, and how did you get my address?” This is something Frontiers have explicitly claimed they’re trying to address, opening up such paths to junior researchers, but it’s not a stated aim on their website or in the emails.

The article that formed the basis of my invitation has been cited once – by me – so if you want to tell me that this is an article that can form the keystone of a research topic, you need to do more than re-state the title. Tell me why it’s interesting and why it might fit. Otherwise, I don’t get the feeling you’ve even read the abstract, and I start to get the impression that these special issue Research Topics are perhaps not so special.

So in other words, if you want to appeal to us juniors, you have to overcome both our insecurity in our early career status and our doubts about your sincerity. If you want to reach out to us, make it feel like you’re interested in *us* and have some idea what our research area actually *is*. That’s if that’s what you really want to do.